Holiday Brew Schedule

It’s that time of year where we get to share our favorite hobby with some of our favorite people. Get your brew kettles ready, and use the dates below to plan out your homebrew and packaging days, so that you can have everything ready in time for all of the festivities. 

Beer makes one of the best food pairing choices, and what’s better than sharing your homebrew creations with your friends & family over a wall paired meal?!

Thanksgiving Dinner

Oh my. The myriad of flavors that range from salty to sweet, from fatty to tart. Damn, we love pairing beer with Thanksgiving dinner. 

There are just so many opportunities for beer flavor to mingle and interact with our favorite Thanksgiving traditions. 

Brew Day: Nov. 1-7
As long as you are pitching plenty of yeast to get the job done, nearly any beer can and should be done with fermentation by day 7-10. That means for lagers, you’ll want to more than double down on the yeast, and if it’s a high gravity beer, go even further. Oxygenate well, and use a quality yeast nutrient. We’re not saying to rush things for the sake of it. We’re saying that if you take the proper precautions you can have great beer and avoid off-flavors.

Bottling Day: Nov. 11-15
If you are bottling your beer, you’re going to need at least 7 days (that’s pushing your luck a bit), or more like 10 days (safe bet), or better yet 14 days. So this will be your weekend to get everything in the bottle.

Kegging Day: Nov. 17-24
Kegging your beer really cuts down on effort and time. The ideal scenario is to keg 1 week prior to service, and leave at service pressure and temp (roughly 12psi at 36f) the entire time, and your beer should be pouring well. You can shave time off by setting it at 30 psi for the first 3 days. You can do a “crash landing” by setting the keg to 45 psi and rolling the keg back and forth for 15 minutes. Expect more foam and varied results, but hey, sometimes you need the extra time in the fermenter. 

End Of Year Feasts

Regardless of your religious or cultural background, this is a time to celebrate, and in fact for all of us to celebrate that diversity in our community! So get those homebrews ready and try some food pairings with every tradition!

Brew Day: Dec. 1-7 (later for NYE)
As long as you are pitching plenty of yeast to get the job done, nearly any beer can and should be done with fermentation by day 7-10. That means for lagers, you’ll want to more than double down on the yeast, and if it’s a high gravity beer, go even further. Oxygenate well, and use a quality yeast nutrient. We’re not saying to rush things for the sake of it. We’re saying that if you take the proper precautions you can have great beer and avoid off-flavors.

Bottling Day: Nov. 11-15
If you are bottling your beer, you’re going to need at least 7 days (that’s pushing your luck a bit), or more like 10 days (safe bet), or better yet 14 days. So this will be your weekend to get everything in the bottle.

Kegging Day: Nov. 17-31
Kegging your beer really cuts down on effort and time. The ideal scenario is to keg 1 week prior to service, and leave at service pressure and temp (roughly 12psi at 36f) the entire time, and your beer should be pouring well. You can shave time off by setting it at 30 psi for the first 3 days. You can do a “crash landing” by setting the keg to 45 psi and rolling the keg back and forth for 15 minutes. Expect more foam and varied results, but hey, sometimes you need the extra time in the fermenter. DEc

RECIPE IDEAS!

Oh yes, we love this part! Picking out the next recipe is one of our favorite things to do. There are seriously too many great ideas and options out there!!!!

Where to start? We start with tradition… as in if it grows together it goes together. If we look around we have plenty examples of holiday beers that we can use as inspiration.

Winter seasonal tend to showcase malt, but they can still be plenty bitter. Most of us think as holiday beers as big boozy malt bombs, but they can also be dry, refreshing saisons. Many examples use extra spices like clove, coriander, nutmeg etc… so feel free to mix in some of your favorite spices as well!

Here’s a recipe for a Belgian Amber that we think works really well. Fee free to use this as a starting point, or you can grab the whole kit from us. You can select the Extract or All-Grain version. 

Belgian Amber w/ Rye | Belgian Ale 

Style: 

ABV:

IBU:

OG:

FG:

Belgian Pale Ale (24 b)

5.0%

23

1.048

1.010

One of our personal favorites.  Slightly malt forward, a touch of fruity Belgian yeast, with a hint of rye for a spicy complexity.

Fermentables

3 lb

Sparkling Amber DME

3 lb 

Pilsen Light DME

1 lb   

8 oz   

8 oz   

8 oz     

Rye Malt

Caravienne 20l

Double Roasted Crystal

Flaked Oats

Hops Schedule
1.0 oz East Kent Golding (pellet) 5.1% AA 60 min       
1.0 oz Saaz  (pellet) 3.8% AA 15 min          
1.0 oz Tettnang (pellet) 4.4% AA 0 min

Yeast:
Safale B-256, or White Labs WLP530 – Abbey Ale Yeast

All Grain Option
Replace All Malt Extract with 2.5 lb of each: Munich 1, British Pale, Skagit Fritz Pilsner and Mash at 149F for 60min.